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Cake, Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake (MAGIMIX CE Method)

Wild Sourdough Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake

(MAGIMIX CE Method)

VEGAN option: use vegan butter/margarine

Gluten Free option: use brown rice starter (avail from my website) and Gluten Free plain flour

I always adore making and eating fruit cake, so creating this recipe was a joy. This cake has the texture of a classic Christmas cake – dense and complex in flavour, which is what you want for an exceptional and easy-to-digest Christmas cake. You do have the option to add a teaspoon of baking powder to make this cake lighter but it is not essential. This recipe is versatile so you can change the dried fruit mix (about 325–400g) to suit your taste. One combination I love is dried pear, hazelnut and ground cardamom.

The method is quite simple, just like making any traditional butter cake. The white sourdough starter is added at the end of the mixing before the addition of fruits and nuts. The long fermentation allows pre-digestion of gluten, fat and sugar. You can use wheat instead of spelt or kamut/khorasan. Khorasan is worth a try, because for some people this unhybridised/ancient wheat is easier to digest than modern wheat. However, please consult your medical practitioner for advice.

Magimix CE function which allows you to keep the blade stationary at a perfect fermenting temperature of 30C is perfect for this cake, especially if you make this cake in Nothern Hemisphere pre-Christmas time. Allow 4 hours to ferment this cake using the Expert Programme, Speed 0, at 30C.

NOTE: This cake is full of fruit, so the cake mixture will not double in size. If you prefer a more complex flavoured cake, you need to make this cake 1–2 months before Christmas.

Use the best quality organic dried fruit you can buy!

Cake, Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake (MAGIMIX CE Method)

This is a dense fruitcake which has a more complex flavour than traditional fruitcake because it is naturally fermented with sourdough culture. It is naturally easier to digest than a traditional fruit cake. This cake relies on the sweetness of the dried fruit rather than refined sugar.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time5 hrs 15 mins
Course: cake
Cuisine: english
Servings: 20 cake
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

Fruit and Liqueur mixture - prepare at least a day before and up to 2 months

  • 125 grams small dark raisins (muscatels) or sultanas
  • 75 grams dried black cherries or cranberries
  • 25 grams candied peels (candied orange and candied citron)
  • 50 grams dried apricots
  • 50 grams dried figs
  • 50 grams activated nuts of your choice optional
  • 50 grams brandy, whisky or your liqueur of choice

Flour and spice mixture

  • 125 grams organic white spelt flour or khorasan flour You can use wheat if you prefer
  • 1-2 tsp mixed spice Speculaas spice is a favorite
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger or cloves optional
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt

Butter mixture

  • 125 grams butter, softened at room temperature
  • 150 grams dark brown or rapadura sugar
  • 150 grams Raw sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste or 1 vanilla bean split lengthwise and scraped
  • 3 large organic eggs (150g without shell) at room temperature
  • 250 grams white spelt or kamut sourdough starter
  • 25 grams molasses

Instructions

Mix fruit and liqueur

  • Prepare the fruit and liqueur mixture at least a day before you plan to make the Christmas cake. You can also prepare the mixture a few weeks beforehand for a stronger flavour. Mix the ingredients together and leave to marinate at least overnight. The next day, drain the mixture, separating it into fruit and liquid. The fruit will be added to the cake, while the liquid will be used to glaze it once baked.

Mix ingredients

  • Put the flour and spice mixture ingredients in your metal bowl, run the EXPERT programme and mix for 20 seconds/speed 7. Put aside.
  • Beat soft butter, the two sugars and vanilla in the metal bowl with the whisk attachment, run the PASTRY/CAKE programme for 2 minutes/speed 7 until light and creamy. Scrape down sides frequently to make sure the ingredients are well mixed.
  • With the programme running, slowly add eggs one by one through hole in lid. Allow 30 seconds between the addition of each egg. Stop mixing once the mixture looks curdled. Scrape sides of bowl.
  • Add sourdough starter and molasses and continue whisking. Scrape sides of bowl.
  • Add pre-mixed flour and spice mixture and continue whisking until the programme ends. Do not over-mix or you will end up with a tough cake. Scrape sides of bowl, if necessary.
  • Remove the whisk. Ferment your cake mixture for 4–6 hours with the lid on, if you are making this cake in warmer weather such Australian pre-Christmas weather. Alternatively, if the room temperature is cold (ie. Northern Hemisphere Christmas), run the Expert programme 30C/speed 0/4hours . The cake mixture will rise about 1¼–1½ its original volume.

Prepare cake tins

  • Line cake tins with butter then line with silicone coated baking or parchment paper (e.g. Gladbake). You have the option of using: • 20cm diameter (8in) round cake tin – each holds 1kg of mixture, or • 2 x 12.5cm (5in) round cake tin – each holds 500–550g of mixture, or • 8–10 muffins – each holds 120–150g of mixture.

Add and mix

  • Add drained fruit to the cake mixture and run the Expert programme for 20 seconds/speed 5, until the fruit is well distributed. Pour into lined tin or tins. You should only fill two-thirds of the tin or the cake mixture will overflow during baking.

Bake

  • Put the cake inside a cold oven and set the temperature to 165°C (329°F). Here are the baking times depending on the size of cake tin you used: For 20cm (8in) tins Bake on lower third rack for 45 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). Then reduce heat to 150°C (302°F) and bake for a further 1 ½–2 hours until golden brown. If the cake top browns too quickly, cover it with aluminium foil. For 12.5cm (5in) tins Bake on lower third rack for 1 hour 15 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). For muffins Bake on lower third rack for 40–45 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). Remove cake from the oven and brush generously with the leftover liqueur. You can brush your cake with any liqueur of your choice (brandy, rum, whisky, Cointreau) every few days for a month before Christmas. This will make your cake so delicious and moist.

Rest

  • Leave to cool before cutting. Best kept wrapped tightly in waxed paper and aluminium foil. Leave in the coolest part of your house and it will keep for 1–2 months or alternatively it can be frozen for up to 3 months.

Cake, Wild Sourdough Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake

Wild Sourdough Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake BY HAND

VEGAN option: use vegan butter/margarine

Gluten Free option: use brown rice starter (avail from my website) and Gluten Free plain flour

I always adore making and eating fruit cake, so creating this recipe was a joy. This cake has the texture of a classic Christmas cake – dense and complex in flavour, which is what you want for an exceptional and easy-to-digest Christmas cake. You do have the option to add a teaspoon of baking powder to make this cake lighter but it is not essential. This recipe is versatile so you can change the dried fruit mix (about 325–400g) to suit your taste. One combination I love is dried pear, hazelnut and ground cardamom.

The method is quite simple, just like making any traditional butter cake. The white sourdough starter is added at the end of the mixing before the addition of fruits and nuts. The long fermentation allows pre-digestion of gluten, fat and sugar. You can use wheat instead of spelt or kamut/khorasan. Khorasan is worth a try, because for some people this unhybridised/ancient wheat is easier to digest than modern wheat. However, please consult your medical practitioner for advice.

NOTE: This cake is full of fruit, so the cake mixture will not double in size. If you prefer a more complex flavoured cake, you need to make this cake 1–2 months before Christmas.

Use the best quality organic dried fruit you can buy!

Cake, Wild Sourdough Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake

This is a dense fruitcake which has a more complex flavour than traditional fruitcake because it is naturally fermented with sourdough culture. It is naturally easier to digest than a traditional fruit cake. This cake relies on the sweetness of the dried fruit rather than refined sugar.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time5 hrs 15 mins
Course: cake
Cuisine: english
Servings: 20 cake
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

Fruit and Liqueur mixture - prepare at least a day before and up to 2 months

  • 125 grams small dark raisins (muscatels) or sultanas
  • 75 grams dried black cherries or cranberries
  • 25 grams candied peels (candied orange and candied citron)
  • 50 grams dried apricots
  • 50 grams dried figs
  • 50 grams activated nuts of your choice optional
  • 50 grams brandy, whisky or your liqueur of choice

Flour and spice mixture

  • 125 grams organic white spelt flour or khorasan flour You can use wheat if you prefer
  • 1-2 tsp mixed spice Speculaas spice is a favorite
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger or cloves optional
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt

Butter mixture

  • 125 grams butter, softened at room temperature
  • 150 grams dark brown or rapadura sugar
  • 150 grams Raw sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste or 1 vanilla bean split lengthwise and scraped
  • 3 large organic eggs (150g without shell) at room temperature
  • 250 grams white spelt or kamut sourdough starter
  • 25 grams molasses

Instructions

Mix fruit and liqueur

  • Prepare the fruit and liqueur mixture at least a day before you plan to make the Christmas cake. You can also prepare the mixture a few weeks beforehand for a stronger flavour. Mix the ingredients together and leave to marinate at least overnight. The next day, drain the mixture, separating it into fruit and liquid. The fruit will be added to the cake, while the liquid will be used to glaze it once baked.

Mix ingredients

  • Put the flour and spice mixture ingredients in a large bowl and whisk until the flour mixture is well distributed. Put aside. Beat/Whisk soft butter, the two sugars and vanilla in a bowl until light and creamy. This will take a few minutes by hand. Scrape down sides frequently to make sure the ingredients are well mixed. Slowly add eggs one by one and stop mixing once the mixture looks curdled. Scrape sides of bowl. Add sourdough starter and molasses and mix well but gently. Scrape sides of bowl. Gently mix in the pre-mixed flour and spice mixture. Do not over-mix or you will end up with a tough cake. Scrape sides of bowl. Cover and ferment your cake mixture for 4–6 hours. The cake mixture will rise about 1¼–1½ its original volume.

Prepare cake tins

  • Line cake tins with butter then line with silicone coated baking or parchment paper (e.g. Gladbake). You have the option of using: • 20cm diameter (8in) round cake tin – each holds 1kg of mixture, or • 2 x 12.5cm (5in) round cake tin – each holds 500–550g of mixture, or • 8–10 muffins – each holds 120–150g of mixture.

Add and mix

  • Add drained fruit to fermented cake mixture, making sure the fruit is well distributed. If you have decided to use baking powder to make the cake lighter, add the baking powder now. I prefer the cake without the baking powder as I like my fruitcake dense. Pour into lined tin or tins. You should only fill two-thirds of the tin or the cake mixture will overflow during baking.

Bake

  • Put the cake inside a cold oven and set the temperature to 165°C (329°F). Here are the baking times depending on the size of cake tin you used: For 20cm (8in) tins Bake on lower third rack for 45 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). Then reduce heat to 150°C (302°F) and bake for a further 1 ½–2 hours until golden brown. If the cake top browns too quickly, cover it with aluminium foil. For 12.5cm (5in) tins Bake on lower third rack for 1 hour 15 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). For muffins Bake on lower third rack for 40–45 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). Remove cake from the oven and brush generously with the leftover liqueur. You can brush your cake with any liqueur of your choice (brandy, rum, whisky, Cointreau) every few days for a month before Christmas. This will make your cake so delicious and moist.

Rest

  • Leave to cool before cutting. Best kept wrapped tightly in waxed paper and aluminium foil. Leave in the coolest part of your house and it will keep for 1–2 months or alternatively it can be frozen for up to 3 months.

Cake, Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake (Thermomix Method)

Wild Sourdough Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake (Thermomix Method)

VEGAN option: use vegan butter/margarine

Gluten Free option: use brown rice starter (avail from my website) and Gluten Free plain flour

always adore making and eating fruit cake, so creating this recipe was a joy. This cake has the texture of a classic Christmas cake – dense and complex in flavour, which is what you want for an exceptional and easy-to-digest Christmas cake. You do have the option to add a teaspoon of baking powder to make this cake lighter but it is not essential. This recipe is versatile so you can change the dried fruit mix (about 325–400g) to suit your taste. One combination I love is dried pear, hazelnut and ground cardamom.

The method is quite simple, just like making any traditional butter cake. The white sourdough starter is added at the end of the mixing before the addition of fruits and nuts. The long fermentation allows pre-digestion of gluten, fat and sugar. You can use wheat instead of spelt or kamut/khorasan. Khorasan is worth a try, because for some people this unhybridised/ancient wheat is easier to digest than modern wheat. However, please consult your medical practitioner for advice.

NOTE: This cake is full of fruit, so the cake mixture will not double in size. If you prefer a more complex flavoured cake, you need to make this cake 1–2 months before Christmas.

Use the best quality organic dried fruit you can buy!

Cake, Spelt or Khorasan Christmas Cake (Thermomix Method)

a dense fruitcake has a more complex flavour than traditional fruitcake because it is naturally fermented with sourdough culture. it is naturally easier to digest than a traditional fruit cake. it also relies on the sweetness of the dried fruit rather than refined sugar.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time5 hrs 15 mins
Course: cake
Cuisine: english
Servings: 20 cake
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

Fruit and Liqueur mixture - prepare at least a day before and up to 2 months

  • 125 grams small dark raisins (muscatels) or sultanas
  • 75 grams dried black cherries or cranberries
  • 25 grams candied peels (candied orange and candied citron)
  • 50 grams dried apricots
  • 50 grams dried figs
  • 50 grams activated nuts of your choice optional
  • 50 grams brandy, whisky or your liqueur of choice

Flour and spice mixture

  • 125 grams organic white spelt flour or khorasan flour You can use wheat if you prefer
  • 1-2 tsp mixed spice Speculaas spice is a favorite
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger or cloves optional
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt

Butter mixture

  • 125 grams butter, softened at room temperature
  • 150 grams dark brown or rapadura sugar
  • 150 grams Raw sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste or 1 vanilla bean split lengthwise and scraped
  • 3 large organic eggs (150g without shell) at room temperature
  • 250 grams white spelt or kamut sourdough starter
  • 25 grams molasses

Instructions

Mix fruit and liqueur

  • Prepare the fruit and liqueur mixture at least a day before you plan to make the Christmas cake. You can also prepare the mixture a few weeks beforehand for a stronger flavour. Mix the ingredients together and leave to marinate at least overnight. The next day, drain the mixture, separating it into fruit and liquid. The fruit will be added to the cake, while the liquid will be used to glaze it once baked.

Mix ingredients

  • Put the flour and spice mixture ingredients in your TM bowl and mix for 10 seconds/speed 5. Put aside. Beat soft butter, the two sugars and vanilla in TM bowl for 1½–2 minutes/speed 3–4 until light and creamy. Scrape down sides frequently to make sure the ingredients are well mixed. With the machine running at speed 3, slowly add eggs one by one through hole in mixing bowl lid. Stop mixing once the mixture looks curdled. Scrape sides of bowl. Add sourdough starter and molasses and mix for 10–15 seconds/speed 2. Scrape sides of bowl. Add pre-mixed flour and spice mixture to TM bowl and mix for 10–15 seconds/speed 2–3. Do not over-mix or you will end up with a tough cake. Scrape sides of bowl. With the TM bowl lid and MC back in place, ferment your cake mixture for 4–6 hours. The cake mixture will rise about 1¼–1½ its original volume.

Prepare cake tins

  • Line cake tins with butter then line with silicone coated baking or parchment paper (e.g. Gladbake). You have the option of using: • 20cm diameter (8in) round cake tin – each holds 1kg of mixture, or • 2 x 12.5cm (5in) round cake tin – each holds 500–550g of mixture, or • 8–10 muffins – each holds 120–150g of mixture.

Add and mix

  • Add drained fruit to the TM bowl and mix for 10–20 seconds/speed 3/Reverse, making sure the fruit is well distributed. If you have decided to use baking powder to make the cake lighter, add the baking powder now. I prefer the cake without the baking powder as I like my fruitcake dense. Pour into lined tin or tins. You should only fill two-thirds of the tin or the cake mixture will overflow during baking.

Bake

  • Put the cake inside a cold oven and set the temperature to 165°C (329°F). Here are the baking times depending on the size of cake tin you used: For 20cm (8in) tins Bake on lower third rack for 45 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). Then reduce heat to 150°C (302°F) and bake for a further 1 ½–2 hours until golden brown. If the cake top browns too quickly, cover it with aluminium foil. For 12.5cm (5in) tins Bake on lower third rack for 1 hour 15 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). For muffins Bake on lower third rack for 40–45 minutes at initial temperature of 165°C (329°F). Remove cake from the oven and brush generously with the leftover liqueur. You can brush your cake with any liqueur of your choice (brandy, rum, whisky, Cointreau) every few days for a month before Christmas. This will make your cake so delicious and moist.

Rest

  • Leave to cool before cutting. Best kept wrapped tightly in waxed paper and aluminium foil. Leave in the coolest part of your house and it will keep for 1–2 months or alternatively it can be frozen for up to 3 months.

Sourdough, Purple and Heirloom Ancient Wheat Grains (MAGIMIX CE)

Purple and Heirloom Ancient Wheat Sourdough with Sunflower Seeds

USING NEW MAGIMIX CE DOUGH BLADE

Ancient Purple Wheat and Heirloom Wheat, both unhybridised species of ancient wheat grains, have recently become available in Australia and are now being grown either organically or sustainably in the northern part of NSW. Even better the ones I have been able to get my hands on are stoneground, so they have retained the wheatgerm where all the goodness (vitamins, minerals, beneficial oil) lies. I have never been this excited since I found stoneground Australian organic Khorasan (aka Kamut)!

Purple wheat has the added benefit of the high antioxidant anthocyanin, which gives the same purple colour that exists in blueberries. All three ancient grains above (Khorasan, Purple Wheat, Heirloom) also have the added benefit of high protein but of a different variety than the usual kind; hence they are much more easily digestible compared to modern wheat protein/gluten. Though of course in my opinion, every grain must be either soaked, sprouted or lacto fermented as it is in sourdough bread fermentation prior to consumption.

I like to support this new wave of using ancient grains and the organic and/or sustainable farming of it here in Australia, as these grains are naturally drought and pest resistant, and are therefore much easier for our farmers to grow in Australia’s desert-like climate. Spelt on the other hand, is better suited to colder climates as it requires a lot more water to grow. So with this being said, lets support our farmers or these ancient varieties will become extinct and we will end up with only hybridised types of wheat.

And did I mention that it is so DELICIOUS ??? So here is a recipe for an amazingly delicious and highly digestible sourdough loaf. If you don’t already have a starter culture, you can make your own or purchase my 35+ year old starter culture from the online shop.

Do not over-knead or over-rise… the protein/gluten in these ancient varieties cannot tolerate vigorous kneading or over rising and high temperatures (26-28C is perfect).

For those of you on a FODMAP or low GI diet this bread may be suitable for you, but consult your health practitioner for advice.

Sourdough, Purple and Heirloom Ancient Wheat Grains (MAGIMIX CE)

Vegan, no added yeast or sugar.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time13 hrs
Servings: 1 large loaf
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

STARTER ACTIVATION

  • 50 g sourdough starter
  • 60 g purple wheat flour, wholegrain flour fine stoneground
  • 90 g filtered water

WET INGREDIENTS

  • 200 g STARTER ACTIVE, from above
  • 600 g filtered water

DRY INGREDIENTS

  • 300 g purple wheat flour, wholegrain flour fine stoneground
  • 500 g heirloom flour, atta or white unbleached 85% extraction (coarse bran removed) fine stoneground
  • 15 g fine sea salt TO BE ADDED AFTER REST/ AUTOLYSE
  • 100-150 g sunflower seeds TO BE ADDED AFTER KNEAD

Instructions

  • Sourdough starter - Activate starter 6-12 hours prior to making dough. Whisk/Stir well and leave covered in the warmest spot in your house, but not in direct heat. Use when bubbly
  • Measure ingredients - Beginning with the starter, weigh and place the wet ingredients into your Magimix metal bowl. Then weigh and add the dry ingredients, except salt
  • ROUGH Mix ingredients - USE MAGIMIX CE DOUGH HOOK XL Set your machine to "BREAD/BRIOCHE" programme - speed 13, which will nicely mix/knead the dough in 1min increments. Run for the full 2 mins . The mixture will look dry at the beginning but the final dough mixture will be wet and homogeneous
  • Rest - AUTOLYSE Let the dough rest in the bowl for 30-60 minutes.
  • First rise - Unload the dough into a container with a lid or inside a freezer bag to rise for 1 hour in a covered container at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F).
  • KNEAD ADD SALT, Set your machine to "BREAD/BRIOCHE" programme - speed 13, for 1 min then rest for 30mins in the bowl. Repeat this sequence of 1 min knead and 30 min Rest, three times. Make sure that the lid is on in between knead (during rest times).
  • Add sunflower seeds Add sunflower seeds then set your machine to "BREAD/BRIOCHE" programme - speed 13, for 1 min. The seeds will be equally distributed without being chopped.
  • Divide and shape - Shape the dough into a ball and put it into your medium tin or floured banneton. If your tin is uncoated please brush tin with coconut oil and line with baking paper.
  • Final rise/double the dough volume - Rise the shaped dough at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F), until almost doubled. This will take 3-5 hours or longer if your room temperature is colder or shorter if your dough has risen substantially in the fridge. Preheat your oven to 250-260°C (455-500°F) with a Dutch OVEN to fit your loaf when your dough is almost doubled.
  • Bake - Bake dough inside your dutch oven for 15 minutes at 250-260°C (455-500°F), then reduce the oven to 225°C (437°F) for a further 15 minutes. Take lid off the dutch oven and bake for a further 15-20 mins at 205°C (401°F) until the loaf has cooked through, turn the oven off, and let it sit for 10 minutes. If you are unsure, insert a thermometer, the inner temperature of the dough should be 95°C (203°F) or higher. Remove loaf from the oven, unload to a cooling rack taking care not to burn your fingers!
  • Rest Let the bread cool before cutting. Suitable for freezing and will keep for a couple of months frozen.

Notes

FullSizeRender

What Equipment you need:

  • Proving Basket
  • Scales
  • LARGE Mixing Bowl
  • Spatula
  • Dough Scrapers

Sourdough, Purple and Heirloom Ancient Wheat Grains

Purple and Heirloom Ancient Wheat Sourdough

Ancient Purple Wheat and Heirloom Wheat, both unhybridised species of ancient wheat grains, have recently become available in Australia and are now being grown either organically or sustainably in the northern part of NSW. Even better the ones I have been able to get my hands on are stoneground, so they have retained the wheatgerm where all the goodness (vitamins, minerals, beneficial oil) lies. I have never been this excited since I found stoneground Australian organic Khorasan (aka Kamut)!

Purple wheat has the added benefit of the high antioxidant anthocyanin, which gives the same purple colour that exists in blueberries. All three ancient grains above (Khorasan, Purple Wheat, Heirloom) also have the added benefit of high protein but of a different variety than the usual kind; hence they are much more easily digestible compared to modern wheat protein/gluten. Though of course in my opinion, every grain must be either soaked, sprouted or lacto fermented as it is in sourdough bread fermentation prior to consumption.

I like to support this new wave of using ancient grains and the organic and/or sustainable farming of it here in Australia, as these grains are naturally drought and pest resistant, and are therefore much easier for our farmers to grow in Australia’s desert-like climate. Spelt on the other hand, is better suited to colder climates as it requires a lot more water to grow. So with this being said, lets support our farmers or these ancient varieties will become extinct and we will end up with only hybridised types of wheat.

And did I mention that it is so DELICIOUS ??? So here is a recipe for an amazingly delicious and highly digestible sourdough loaf. If you don’t already have a starter culture, you can make your own or purchase my 35+ year old starter culture from the online shop.

Do not over-knead or over-rise… the protein/gluten in these ancient varieties cannot tolerate vigorous kneading or over rising and high temperatures (26-28C is perfect).

For those of you on a FODMAP or low GI diet this bread may be suitable for you, but consult your health practitioner for advice.

Sourdough Loaf, Purple & Heritage Pain au Levain

Vegan, no added yeast or sugar.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time13 hrs
Servings: 1 large loaf
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

STARTER ACTIVATION

  • 50 g sourdough starter
  • 60 g purple wheat flour, wholegrain flour fine stoneground
  • 90 g filtered water

WET INGREDIENTS

  • 200 g STARTER ACTIVE, from above
  • 600 g filtered water

DRY INGREDIENTS

  • 300 g purple wheat flour, wholegrain flour fine stoneground
  • 500 g heirloom flour, atta or white unbleached 85% extraction (coarse bran removed) fine stoneground
  • 15 g fine sea salt TO BE ADDED AFTER REST/ AUTOLYSE

Instructions

  • Sourdough starter - Activate starter 6-12 hours prior to making dough. Whisk/Stir well and leave covered in the warmest spot in your house, but not in direct heat. Use when bubbly
  • Measure ingredients - Beginning with the starter, weigh and place the wet ingredients into your bowl. Then weigh and add the dry ingredients, except salt
  • Mix ingredients - Mix with a strong spatula or a small scraper until well mixed. The mixture will look dry at the beginning but the final dough mixture will be wet and homogeneous
  • Rest - AUTOLYSE Turn your bowl upside down and let the dough rest for 30-60 minutes.
  • First rise - Unload the dough into a container with a lid or inside a freezer bag to rise for 1 hour in a covered container at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F).
  • ADD SALT, then Stretch and fold - Stretch and fold your dough two or three times (and no more than three times) every half an hour, three times. Make sure you cover your dough in between stretch and fold. AT THIS STAGE, you can retard or refrigerate your dough overnight or up to 2 days in a cold (1-3C) fridge.
  • Divide and shape - Shape the dough into a ball and put it into your medium tin or floured banneton. If your tin is uncoated please brush tin with coconut oil and line with baking paper.
  • Final rise/double the dough volume - Rise the shaped dough at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F), until almost doubled. This will take 3-5 hours or longer if your room temperature is colder or shorter if your dough has risen substantially in the fridge. Preheat your oven to 250-260°C (455-500°F) with a Dutch OVEN to fit your loaf when your dough is almost doubled.
  • Bake - Bake dough inside your dutch oven for 15 minutes at 250-260°C (455-500°F), then reduce the oven to 225°C (437°F) for a further 15 minutes. Take lid off the dutch oven and bake for a further 15-20 mins at 205°C (401°F) until the loaf has cooked through, turn the oven off, and let it sit for 10 minutes. If you are unsure, insert a thermometer, the inner temperature of the dough should be 95°C (203°F) or higher. Remove loaf from the oven, unload to a cooling rack taking care not to burn your fingers!
  • Rest - Let the bread cool before cutting. Suitable for freezing and will keep for a couple of months frozen.

Notes

FullSizeRender

What Equipment you need:

  • Proving Basket
  • Scales
  • LARGE Mixing Bowl
  • Spatula
  • Dough Scrapers

Light Rye Sourdough with Caraway Seed

Light Rye Sourdough with Caraway Seed

This recipe was created for my dearest girlfriend who had been asking for a sourdough loaf that is strongly flavoured with caraway seeds (she is part Czech if you must know!). The secret to success in this recipe is to follow the recipe to a tee and resist the temptation of adding extra rye flour because you will find the dough become a paste in no time. Rye contains a glue-like non-starch polysaccharide called “pentosan’. When rye is mixed with water these pentosans form glue/gel which increases the viscosity in the dough, absorbing and holding on more water than other form of wheat, hence most rye bread are incredibly moist and if you have no idea how to work with rye, a brick like loaf may be the reward of your painstaking labour, so FOLLOW the recipe!!!

If you don’t already have a starter culture, you can make your own or purchase my 35+ year old starter culture from the online shop.

For those of you on a low GI diet this bread may be suitable for you, but consult your health practitioner for advice.

Light Rye Sourdough with Caraway Seed

Vegan, no added yeast, additives or preservative Naturally fermented Long fermentation
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time13 hrs
Servings: 1 loaves
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

WET INGREDIENTS

  • 125 g sourdough starter (see below)
  • 550 g filtered water
  • 75 g strong coffee chicory or dandellion coffee is brilliant too
  • 1-2 tbs black strapped molasses unsulphured

DRY INGREDIENTS

  • 500 g organic white flour of your choice wheat or spelt, organic if possible
  • 150 g stoneground whole rye flour
  • 150g g wholemeal flour of your choice wheat or spelt, organic if possible
  • 1-2 tbs caraway seeds
  • 1-2 tbs caraway seed powder to your taste
  • 3 tsp Sea salt finely ground

Instructions

  • Sourdough starter - Activate starter 6-12 hours prior to making dough. Whisk/Stir well and leave covered in the warmest spot in your house, but not in direct heat. Use when bubbly
  • Measure ingredients - Beginning with the starter, weigh and place the wet ingredients into your bowl. Then weigh and add the dry ingredients, excluding the salt and caraway seeds
  • Mix ingredients - Mix with a strong spatula or a small scraper until well mixed. The mixture will look dry at the beginning but the final dough mixture will look slightly wet and homogeneous
  • Rest / AUTOLYSE Turn your bowl upside down and let the dough rest for 45-60 minutes.
  • Knead - ADD salt and caraway seeds and a spray of water mist Put your dough back inside the bowl and knead your dough using the air kneading technique. The resulting dough may stick slightly to your fingers, but it should not be overly wet.
  • First rise - Unload the dough into a container with a lid or inside a freezer bag to rise for 2-4 hours in a covered container at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F). THE DOUGH MUST INCREASE IN SIZE by 50-75%, so cooler weather this may take longer. To keep the temperature at constant, you can purchase a Brod & Taylor Folding Proofer, from my website: https://wildsourdough.com.au/product-category/wild-sourdough-equipment/
  • Stretch and fold - Stretch and fold your dough two or three times (and no more than three times). Your dough will feel taut.
  • Rest - Let the dough sit for 15–20 minutes to relax the gluten.
  • Divide and shape - Shape the dough into a ball and put it into two floured banneton.
  • Final rise/double the dough volume - Rise the shaped dough at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F), until almost doubled. This will take 3-5 hours or longer if your room temperature is colder. Put dough in a covered container or inside a freezer bag. You can also do this final rise in the fridge overnight (5-8°C/ 41-47°F)
  • Bake - Use a Dutch Oven if you have one. Preheat your oven to 250°C (482°F) when your dough is almost doubled. Bake for 15 minutes at 250°C (482°F), then reduce the oven to 235°C (455°F) for a further 15 minutes. Remove lid from Dutch Oven. Bake for a further 10-15 at 200°C (392°F) If you are unsure if the loaf has cooked through, turn the oven off, and let it sit for 10 minutes. Or insert a thermometer, the inner temperature of the dough should be 95°C (200°F) or higher. Remove loaf from the oven, unload to a cooling rack taking care not to burn your fingers!
  • Rest - Let the bread cool before cutting. Suitable for freezing and will keep for a couple of months frozen.

Notes

 

What Equipment you need:

  • Loaf Pans
  • Proving Basket
  • Stand Mixer
  • Scales
  • Mixing Bowl
  • Spatula
  • Dough Scrapers

Hot Cross Buns, Soft Sourdough Chocolate MAGIMIX CE

SOFT SOURDOUGH CHOCOLATE HOT CROSS BUNS – using Magimix CE

(can be made VEGAN*)

 

FullSizeRenderThis is the softest sourdough chocolate hot cross buns you will ever make, and it has the great benefit of containing some good fibre from oats without being recognised by your more fussy little (or big) ones. Making this in the Magimix CE is a breeze…I promise you!

I love a hint of chocolate which pairs nicely with the more traditional hot cross bun mixed spice flavour. If you can get a good quality mixed spice that is fine, but I prefer to use Dutch speculaas spice for a more delicious aroma. You will find this spice from Dutch and South African shops or you can google it and make it from scratch.

If the idea of beetroot frightens you, you can use apple/pear/orange juice instead. For me the beetroot kvass complements and adds depth of flavour to the chocolate.

For chocolate lovers or for your little ones, you can omit the spice completely and use good quality chocolate chips instead of dried fruits.

*for VEGAN version:

Substitute full fat nut milk,substitute butter with vegan butter or macadamia or olive oil, and substitute egg with chia gel made from 1tsp chia and 50g water. Make sure you let the chia gel form which will require some stirring and 3-4 hours to gel or alternatively use hot water, stir and allow to cool.

Hot Cross Buns, Soft Sourdough Chocolate MAGIMIX CE version

Ingredients and method for 12 soft chocolate hot cross buns You will need a lamington tin (25cm x30cm) or a square cake tin (25cm x25cm)
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time8 hrs 55 mins
Servings: 12 buns
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

oat porridge

  • 50 g oatmeal make your own by grinding rolled oats to a flour
  • 250 g full cream milk or full fat nut milk for vegan
  • 2-3 tbs honey, maple syrup, rice malt or raw organic sugar

WET INGREDIENTS

  • 150 g white spelt or wheat sourdough starter active, fed 6-12 hours prior
  • 150 g beetroot kvass or juice apple/pear/orange juice is fine or water
  • 1 egg Large eggs or 2 small eggs
  • ALL oat porridge from above

DRY INGREDIENTS

  • 600 g organic white flour of your choice white spelt or white wheat or unbleached baker's flour
  • 20 g Dutch alkalised cacao powder I use Valhrona. DO NOT use raw cacao powder
  • 1 tbs mixed spice or speculaas spice Use less or omit, your preference
  • 2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 60 g butter, softened at room temperature or vegan butter

INGREDIENT TO ADD TO FINAL DOUGH

  • 200-250 g mixed dried fruit organic if possible (currants, sultanas, mixed peel, cranberries)
  • 200-250 g choc chips couverture choc chips preferred

Instructions

Make oat porridge (at least 4 hrs before)

  • Cook milk and oatmeal in the CE bowl at 70C for 3-4 min speed 3 until they become a thin runny consistency like porridge. Turn off, remove lid and let cool in the bowl Add sugar/rice malt/maple syrup/honey and stir for 20-30 sec at speed 3 Let the mixture sit until it is warm to touch

Make the dough

  • Add all the wet ingredients (except salt and butter) into the dry ingredients. Roughly mix the dough (dough will feel scraggly and dry at this stage) using Brioche setting, speed 9, 1 min. Rest covered in warm room temperature for one hour
  • Add 60g butter and 2tsp fine sea salt. Initial Knead using Bioche setting, speed 9, 1 min. Rest 15 minutes Then 'Normal' Knead using Bioche setting, speed 6-7, 1 min. Rest 15 mins And repeat the normal knead/rest until dough is smooth and shiny - total kneading time approx 4-5mins total
  • Rest overnight in a covered container in fridge if you want to bake within the next 3 days or 2-3hr at room temp if you want to bake on the same day. Dislodge the dough from the bowl onto a buttered/oiled bench when you are ready to make the buns

Mix dried fruit/choc chips

  • Stretch dough into a rectangle about 1/2cm thickness Thaw the dough for one hour if dough is refrigerated. Spread on top of the dough: mixed dried fruit or choc chips - or a mixture of both Roll the dough and filling like a Swiss roll.

Shape buns

  • Cut into 12 portions, then weigh each to be of the same weight (130-140g). Shape dough portions into tight round rolls

Put inside tin

  • Line your baking tin with unbleached silicon coated baking/parchment paper and put all inside a baking tin Spray top generously with water

Rise the buns

  • Rise the buns covered in a warm place away from draft until they "ALMOST" double in size and appear 'puffy'. if you have a proofer, set your proofer at 28-30C with steam or warm water tray underneath to keep it moist. This will take time especially if your room is not warm. The longer they take to double the sourer the hot cross buns will become.

Bake the buns

  • Put your buns in the baking tin in a cold oven and rise the temperature to 205C for 20 minutes. Then reduce the temperature to 180C for 10-15 minutes until the inner temperature reaches 95C. If the buns brown too quickly, cover it with two layers of baking paper.
  • Remove baking tin from the oven and brush generously with the a butter or a mixture of butter and brandy or any orange or chocolate liqueur. Eat warm with lots of butter or they will freeze well after cooling

Notes

 
Kitchen Aid or Kenwood Chef: Mix is 20-30 seconds, speed 1, K beater or dough hook,Knead is 1 minute, then 15min rest, and repeat 3-5 times until dough is shiny
Ankarsrum: Mix is 1-2 minutes dough hook only, lowest speed 1,Knead is 2-3 minute, then 15min rest, and repeat 3-5 times until dough is shiny

Hot Cross Buns, Soft Sourdough Chocolate

SOFT SOURDOUGH CHOCOLATE HOT CROSS BUNS

(can be made VEGAN*)

***FOR MACHINE (THERMOMIX, MAGIMIX CE, KITCHEN AID, KENWOOD, ANKARSRUM) INSTRUCTION SEE BELOW***

FullSizeRenderThis is the softest sourdough chocolate hot cross buns you will ever make, and it has the great benefit of containing some good fibre from oats without being recognised by your more fussy little (or big) ones. I love a hint of chocolate which pairs nicely with the more traditional hot cross bun mixed spice flavour. If you can get a good quality mixed spice that is fine, but I prefer to use Dutch speculaas spice for a more delicious aroma. You will find this spice from Dutch and South African shops or you can google it and make it from scratch.

If the idea of beetroot frightens you, you can use apple/pear/orange juice instead. For me the beetroot kvass complements and adds depth of flavour to the chocolate.

For chocolate lovers or for your little ones, you can omit the spice completely and use good quality chocolate chips instead of dried fruits.

*for VEGAN version:

Substitute full fat nut milk,substitute butter with vegan butter or macadamia or olive oil, and substitute egg with chia gel made from 1tsp chia and 50g water. Make sure you let the chia gel form which will require some stirring and 3-4 hours to gel or alternatively use hot water, stir and allow to cool.

Hot Cross Buns, Soft Sourdough Chocolate

Ingredients and method for 12 soft chocolate hot cross buns You will need a lamington tin (25cm x30cm) or a square cake tin (25cm x25cm)
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time8 hrs 55 mins
Servings: 12 buns
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

oat porridge

  • 50 g oatmeal make your own by grinding rolled oats to a flour
  • 250 g full cream milk or full fat nut milk for vegan
  • 2-3 tbs honey, maple syrup, rice malt or raw organic sugar

WET INGREDIENTS

  • 150 g white spelt or wheat sourdough starter active, fed 6-12 hours prior
  • 150 g beetroot kvass or juice apple/pear/orange juice is fine or water
  • 1 egg Large eggs or 2 small eggs
  • ALL oat porridge from above

DRY INGREDIENTS

  • 600 g organic white flour of your choice white spelt or white wheat or unbleached baker's flour
  • 20 g Dutch alkalised cacao powder I use Valhrona. DO NOT use raw cacao powder
  • 1 tbs mixed spice or speculaas spice Use less or omit, your preference
  • 2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 60 g butter, softened at room temperature or vegan butter

INGREDIENT TO ADD TO FINAL DOUGH

  • 200-250 g mixed dried fruit organic if possible (currants, sultanas, mixed peel, cranberries)
  • 200-250 g choc chips couverture choc chips preferred

Instructions

Make oat porridge (at least 4 hrs before)

  • Cook milk and oatmeal until they become a thin runny consistency like porridge Turn off the heat Add sugar/rice malt/maple syrup/honey Let the mixture sit until it is warm to touch

Make the dough

  • Put the wet ingredients into a bowl. Add all the wet ingredients (except salt and butter) into the dry ingredients. Roughly mix the dough (dough will feel scraggly and dry at this stage) Rest covered in warm room temperature for one hour
  • Add 60g butter and 2tsp fine sea salt Knead well until dough is smooth and shiny (ie. knead like a brioche dough, and this could be done in several kneads/rest) - total kneading time by hand 10mins
  • Rest overnight in a covered container in fridge if you want to bake within the next 3 days or 2-3hr at room temp if you want to bake on the same day.

Mix dried fruit/choc chips

  • Stretch dough into a rectangle about 1/2cm thickness Thaw the dough for one hour if dough is refrigerated. Spread on top of the dough: mixed dried fruit or choc chips - or a mixture of both Roll the dough and filling like a Swiss roll.

Shape buns

  • Cut into 12 portions, then weigh each to be of the same weight (130-140g). Shape dough portions into tight round rolls

Put inside tin

  • Line your baking tin with unbleached silicon coated baking/parchment paper and put all inside a baking tin Spray top generously with water

Rise the buns

  • Rise the buns covered in a warm place away from draft until they "ALMOST" double in size and appear 'puffy'. if you have a proofer, set your proofer at 28-30C with steam or warm water tray underneath to keep it moist. This will take time especially if your room is not warm. The longer they take to double the sourer the hot cross buns will become.

Bake the buns

  • Put your buns in the baking tin in a cold oven and rise the temperature to 205C for 20 minutes. Then reduce the temperature to 180C for 10-15 minutes until the inner temperature reaches 95C. If the buns brown too quickly, cover it with two layers of baking paper.
  • Remove baking tin from the oven and brush generously with the a butter or a mixture of butter and brandy or any orange or chocolate liqueur. Eat warm with lots of butter or they will freeze well after cooling

Notes

Mixing and Kneading can be done with machine:
Thermomix: Mix is 20seconds on knead, and Knead is 1 minute, then 15min rest, and repeat 3-5 times until dough is shiny
Magimix CE: Mix is 1 minute on Bake-Brioche setting at speed 9 then Knead is Bake-Brioche setting at speed 7 for 1 min, then 15 min rest, and repeat 3-5 times until dough is shiny
Kitchen Aid or Kenwood Chef: Mix is 20-30 seconds, speed 1, K beater or dough hook,Knead is 1 minute, then 15min rest, and repeat 3-5 times until dough is shiny
Ankarsrum: Mix is 1-2 minutes dough hook only, lowest speed 1,Knead is 2-3 minute, then 15min rest, and repeat 3-5 times until dough is shiny

Loaf, Almond Chia Spelt

Almond chia spelt ‘express’ loaf

What could be better than the smell of freshly baked bread…well, frankly, freshly baked sourdough bread made by your very own hands! This recipe is based on one of the favourite sourdough breads in my third book, Wild Sourdough By Hand. I have used homemade almond milk to add softness to this already moist and ‘light’ loaf. I prefer to use Australian grown black chia seeds but white chia is fine too. The crumb has a deep caramel brown colour due to the use of wholemeal spelt flour, and is studded with tiny black specks of chia seeds. This loaf will rise faster than the basic loaf as it has double the amount of starter. Start the night before to soak the chia seeds and activate the starter culture. If you don’t already have a starter culture, you can make your own or purchase my 35+ year old starter culture from the online shop.

For those of you on a FODMAP or low GI diet this bread may be suitable for you, but consult your health practitioner for advice.

Loaf, Almond Chia Spelt

Vegan, no added yeast or sugar. *Note: if you are using bought almond milk, make sure you use one that is as close to as just almond and water as possible, beware of the many added ingredients including gum and sugar.
Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

  • 300 g sourdough starter (see below)
  • 250-275 g almond milk
  • 140 g chia seed gel (see below)
  • 300 g wholemeal spelt flour finely milled if possible
  • 300 g white spelt flour
  • 2 tsp Sea salt finely ground
  • chia, sesame or poppy seeds optional topping

Starter

  • 50 g sourdough starter
  • 120 g wholemeal spelt flour
  • 180 g filtered water

Chia Seed Gel

  • 20 g chia seeds
  • 120 g filtered water

Instructions

  • Sourdough starter - Activate starter 6-12 hours prior to making dough. Whisk/Stir well and leave covered in the warmest spot in your house, but not in direct heat. Use when bubbly
  • Chia See Gel - In a clean jar with a lid, add the chia seeds and water, stir a few times to make sure the seeds are well distributed in the water. Soak for 6–12 hours.
  • Measure ingredients - Beginning with the starter, weigh and place the wet ingredients into your bowl. Then weigh and add the dry ingredients, adding the salt last.
  • Mix ingredients - Mix with a strong spatula or a small scraper until well mixed. The mixture will look dry at the beginning but the final dough mixture will look slightly wet and homogeneous
  • Rest - Turn your bowl upside down and let the dough rest for 15-20 minutes.
  • Knead - Put your dough back inside the bowl and knead your dough using the air kneading technique. The resulting dough may stick slightly to your fingers, but it should not be overly wet.
  • First rise - Unload the dough into a container with a lid or inside a freezer bag to rise for 1-2 hours in a covered container at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F).
  • Stretch and fold - Stretch and fold your dough two or three times (and no more than three times). Your dough will feel taut.
  • Rest - Let the dough sit for 15–20 minutes to relax the gluten.
  • Divide and shape - Shape the dough into a ball and put it into your medium tin or floured banneton. If your tin is uncoated please brush tin with coconut oil and line with baking paper.
  • Final rise/double the dough volume - Rise the shaped dough at a comfortable room temperature, around 20–25°C (68–77°F), until almost doubled. This will take 3-5 hours or longer if your room temperature is colder. Mist dough with water using a water spritzer then cover with a sheet of freezer bag or put it in a covered container. Mist with water frequently to prevent drying. Sprinkle with chia, sesame or poppy seeds if desired. Preheat your oven to 235°C (455°F) when your dough is almost doubled.
  • Bake - Bake for 10–12 minutes at 235°C (455°F), then reduce the oven to 205°C (401°F) for a further 20-25 minutes. If you are unsure if the loaf has cooked through, turn the oven off, and let it sit for 10 minutes. Or insert a thermometer, the inner temperature of the dough should be 90°C or higher. Remove loaf from the oven, unload to a cooling rack taking care not to burn your fingers!
  • Rest - Let the bread cool before cutting. Suitable for freezing and will keep for a couple of months frozen.

Notes

11a  11b

What Equipment you need:

  • Loaf Pans
  • Proving Basket
  • Stand Mixer
  • Scales
  • Mixing Bowl
  • Spatula
  • Dough Scrapers

Nut & Chocolate spread (includes Nut Butter Recipe)

This is a recipe using the Magimix Cook Expert

Nut & Chocolate spread (includes Nut Butter Recipe)

Author: YOKE MARDEWI, WILD SOURDOUGH

Ingredients

  • 1 kg Nuts Roasted
  • 100 g 70% Dark couverture chocolate roughly chopped
  • 100 g 50-55% Dark couverture chocoloate roughly chopped

Instructions

  • Make the nut butter - with the food processor attachment, and for 1kg of (roasted) Brazil nuts, it takes about 1minute or 1.5 minutes, to process the nuts into a smooth nut butter or less if you like yours crunchy. Roasted peanuts will take longer because they are harder but it is best to watch it like a hawk as it can turn a crunchy texture into a smooth one in a flash. Pour into wide necked jar/s and let it cool before placing the lid
  • Once your nut butter is made, transfer to the metal bowl and for every half kilo of nut butter, I add 100g of roughly chopped 70% dark couverture chocolate and 100g 50-55% dark couverture chocolate
  • Run the EXPERT programme 3-5 minutes/speed 3/60C
  • Scrape down the side of the bowl and re-run 20-30 seconds/speed 3/60C
  • Pour into wide necked jar/s, let it cool before placing the lid